Florida Weekly Column

Who Will Cross the Bridges?

Who Will Cross the Bridges?

Recently there has been quite a bit of talk about bridge building in our nation and in our communities. Not the literal infrastructure kind of construction but rather symbolic scaffolding to connect people and ideas.

Whenever and wherever there are choppy waters of change, someone suggests building a proverbial bridge.

Just last week during a presentation on inspiring more registered women to vote in the 2020 election, the speaker fielded a number of questions on women’s issues that can cause divisiveness. She urged and encouraged the audience to find common ground and coalitions that encourage bridge building and collective thinking to reach a common goal of getting women to the polls to express their own unique views.

Her comments on bridge building grew applause and affirmative head shaking all around the room and it reminded me of how many times I had heard the term in conversation over the past several months.

At the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, we find ourselves in settings that require connecting diverse views on a regular basis. When you are working alongside passionate advocates and donors you are bound to hear a wide range of views on topics like education, health care, civic engagement, economic development, animals, poverty and arts.

We have found the best opportunities and innovations come out of conversations with a wide range of world views, but that does take some bridge building.

There are organizations, trailblazers, philanthropists, and leaders in our community who are willing to step up to build bridges across regional boundaries, cause areas and social, economic and cultural barriers.

Sometimes the bridge building is a lonely task while other times it gains a great deal of energy and support. Either way the bridge is built; coalitions are established; organizations are formed; and unifying conversations are started.

I see a lot of bridges all over our region. But what I am eager to see next is people willing to walk over them.

We can build goodwill and a framework to navigate some of our most difficult topics but if we as individuals we are not willing to take a step across the infrastructure that has been built nothing can really change.

Take a few minutes to look around and find a bridge that deserves your time and attention and start the journey. And if you want some guidance, reach out to me at [email protected]

CAUSE & EFFECT: Pushing the Tube Up the Mountain Together

CAUSE & EFFECT: Pushing the Tube Up the Mountain Together

If people watching were an official sport, I am fairly certain I could be a contender for the Olympic team or championship game.

Wherever I go I look for opportunities to observe people and their behaviors.  I often say I am listening, but many times I am watching to see what I can learn about others.

Most recently my people watching training took me out of state to a land full of mountains and snow.

One of my favorite people watching moments in these wintery conditions is taking in a couple hours of snow-tubing.  This entails tubers of all ages pushing an inflated rubber tube up a snowy hill to the top and then riding it full speed to the bottom.

Pushing the tube up the mountain is nothing short of a monumental task. Your feet slip, it’s cold, and a tube big enough to ride is just awkward to maneuver.

Kids are the best to watch because the tube is about twice their size, but they are relentless in getting that chariot up the slope because they know the joy of the exhilarating ride to the bottom.

In an afternoon of tubing, the riders will repeat this ritual over and over. But I have noticed some people are more willing to push the tube up the hill than others.

It seems to be some sort of return on investment proposition based on the satisfaction of the ride down.  In my casual observations tenacity is increased when others are there to help or share in the journey.  Groups tubing together will help fellow travelers when the tube gets too cumbersome, and in some cases they will work together to get one tube up the hill and then ride down together.

In every case, the journey is never easy.

A few weeks ago when I was feeling a bit discouraged about a tough journey of my own and was worried about keeping our Southwest Florida Community Foundation team engaged and energized a colleague shared a story she sometimes conveys to her team.

This woman is a trailblazer who I admire and she has successfully launched several community projects that many thought impossible, so I knew she had some sage advice.

Interestingly it also involved a snow laden scenario.  Not of pushing a tube up a hill, but instead a snowball.  She says she often thinks of her projects and community movements as snowballs that are being pushed up a mountain.  At the beginning many people will gather around to help push but when things get tough some fall away.  She keeps her team and volunteers motivated by painting the picture of what will happen once they reach the top of the mountain.

Whatever size snowball they have could roll to the summit; the minute they push it over the other side of the mountain it will gain momentum.  It will pick up speed, size and people who want to be involved.   But none of that happens without finding a way to get to the top with the people who are willing to go with you.

Over the last few months I have read, watched and been inspired by the profiles of the News Press People of the Year nominees and recipients.  These are fellow residents who have accomplished amazing things over the past year.  As my friend shared her story I realized that everyone featured had pushed their own proverbial snowballs up some pretty steep mountains.

Overcoming health issues, human trafficking, business challenges, being under the microscope of the public eye, or finding their way as a next generation leader.  Each story has both its snowball up the mountain and down the mountain moment (You can still find the stories by clicking here).

At the Southwest Florida Community Foundation we also have the great honor and privilege of supporting nonprofit organizations of all sizes and missions in our region.  I see these teams working hard to tackle issues facing the environment, poverty, education, animals, the arts, health and safety, and community development.  They work hard but they need the support of our region.   Just like the tubers who ride in groups, the journey up hill is always better when taken together.

So what snowball or tube are you trying to push up the hill?  Or who could you help up the mountain?  Whichever it is, remember the ride down is worth it and as a semi-pro people (and their causes) watcher, I can’t wait to see what happens next.

The Southwest Florida Community Foundation, founded in 1976, cultivates regional change for the common good through collective leadership, social innovation and philanthropy to address the evolving community needs in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Foundation partners with individuals, families and corporations who have created over 400 philanthropic funds.  Thanks to them, last year the Foundation invested $5 million in grants and programs to the community.  With assets of $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $67 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves since inception. The Foundation is the backbone organization for the regional FutureMakers Coalition and Lee County’s Sustainability Plan.  Based in Fort Myers, the Foundation has satellite offices located in Sanibel Island, LaBelle (Hendry County), and downtown Fort Myers.  For more information, visit www.FloridaCommunity.com or call 239-274-5900.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Love Notes

Community Love Notes

Last week I was driving down College Parkway in Fort Myers and noticed a car stalled out in a turn lane.  A moment later people were racing across the road from a nearby convenience store, pulling over their cars and jumping out to help the young driver push the car to a gas station parking lot.  There were so many people helping I think they could have picked the car up and carried it away.

Others were friendly honking and cheering them on, and I smiled and proclaimed out loud to no one, “I love this place.”  It is encouraging and inspiring to see people come together to help their fellow man.

I was feeling particularly positive since this chance siting happened to fall on Valentine’s Day and I had spent the morning meeting with our team at the Southwest Florida Community Foundation.

Valentine’s Day is the perfect holiday to consider and celebrate philanthropy.  At its core philanthropy means ‘love of humanity.’  Our team was reflecting on the work we see so many of our donors and nonprofits advancing in our region.  Acts of generosity and compassion that are fueled by love.

Our team also recognizes that there are challenges and opportunities facing our region that philanthropy has the potential to impact. But in the spirit of community and Valentine’s Day I asked them to consider and share what they loved about Southwest Florida, their work in the region and the generosity they see in others.

Throughout the day they took a few minutes and captured their thoughts on a white board as a love note to the community and I wanted to share some of them with you.

  • I love the environment
  • I love helping people
  • I love our new LGBT fund and the founding donors
  • I love the hearts and passion of our nonprofit leaders and their teams
  • I love the beaches
  • I love the FutureMakers Coalition
  • I love our donors and fundholders
  • I love that we receive gifts from all over the world (first gift from Germany!)
  • I love the plan for our new Technology Hub in downtown Fort Myers
  • I love the sunshine
  • I love our Women’s Legacy Fund Prima Donors and contributors
  • I love SWFL’s diversity
  • I love impacting lives
  • I love our (volunteer) board of trustees
  • I love our amazing team

That’s some of our list and we have decided to keep it up for a while.  It would be wonderful to add your words to our board and our love note. What do you love about Southwest Florida?   Reach out to me at [email protected], or post it on our Facebook page @SWFLCF or our Twitter page @SWFLCFnd.

 

The Southwest Florida Community Foundation, founded in 1976, cultivates regional change for the common good through collective leadership, social innovation and philanthropy to address the evolving community needs in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Foundation partners with individuals, families and corporations who have created over 400 philanthropic funds.  Thanks to them, last year the Foundation invested $5 million in grants and programs to the community.  With assets of $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $67 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves since inception. The Foundation is the backbone organization for the regional FutureMakers Coalition and Lee County’s Sustainability Plan.  Based in Fort Myers, the Foundation has satellite offices located in Sanibel Island, LaBelle (Hendry County), and downtown Fort Myers.  For more information, visit www.FloridaCommunity.com or call 239-274-5900.

 

 

Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s Annual Report now available

Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s Annual Report now available

The Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s 2014-2015 Annual Report is now available online at www.floridacommunity.com/annual-report.

“2015 was a year of major milestones in the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s work as active change-makers,” said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation.
The Community Foundation’s total assets of $93.5 million increased 13 percent from the previous fiscal year while investments rose 14 percent. The increases are a result of new funds, additional contributions and investment returns.

Since its inception 39 years ago, the Community Foundation has received $110 million in contributions and distributed $63 million in direct support to the community.

Last year, it granted more than $2.9 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services. It also granted $782,000 in nonprofit grants, including more than $551,000 in regional community impact grants and an additional $450,000 in scholarship grants.

“Our flexibility, combined with a comprehensive understanding of community needs, attracted more than 150 new contributions and donors during the 2015 fiscal year – people committed to getting things started now while envisioning future needs,” said Immediate Past Board Chairman Joe Mazurkiewicz.

Highlights from the past year include the FutureMakers Coalition launch in March with the backing of Lumina Foundation to improve the quality of Southwest Florida’s workforce. The Community Foundation is engaging local business and education leaders, government officials, nonprofit organizations and community stakeholders in an ongoing dialogue and cradle-to-career strategies to achieve this goal.

A collaborative effort with the Lee County Board of Commissioners resulted in transferring the CompleteLee community sustainability plan to the Community Foundation in 2015. Over time, the infrastructure established during the four-year planning process, along with more than 80 organizations and hundreds of individual stakeholders, will lead to a regional map that guides the Foundation’s commitment to ensuring a high quality of life and change for the common good through an established collective impact model.

“The components of the plan address Community Foundation causes and the nationally recognized pillars of community sustainability,” said Tessa LeSage, director of social innovation and sustainability at the Community Foundation. “The plan provides measurable outcomes to show the Foundation and our partners how we are making an impact in the areas that lead to the long-term success and desirability of a community. Ultimately, it makes our region a better place to live, work, play and learn.”

The Community Foundation also welcomed its first Florida Fellows from the University of Florida in the summer thanks to the Al and Nancy Burnett Charitable Foundation. The four public interest communications students worked in three local nonprofits that received grants from the Community Foundation. They helped the nonprofits enhance communication and effective storytelling.

The Community Foundation also partnered with the city of Fort Myers to identify opportunities to create greater efficiencies among some of its nonprofit organizations, with a focus on the Imaginarium and the Southwest Florida Museum of History. The yearlong effort allowed the Foundation to contribute to developing plans aimed at establishing a state-of-the-art regional science and history museum and a merged board of directors that would better serve the two organizations and support many of the city’s larger strategic goals. This public-private partnership will improve taxpayers’ return on investment and potentially serve as a catalyst for redevelopment along the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard corridor.

“The Southwest Florida Community Foundation offers customized giving, dedicated to helping every donor find the right opportunity for them, whether it’s a one-time contribution or an endowment that lives on in perpetuity, a family fund or foundation dedicated to a specific cause, or jumpstarting a new idea to fill a community need,” added Owen.

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs.

Copies of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s IRS Form 990, IRS Form 990-T, if required, and the current annual audit are available for your review online at www.floridacommunity.com or at its main office by calling 239-274-5900, ext. 228.

Community Foundation/Brian Tietz Photography seeking Faces of Philanthropy nominations

Community Foundation/Brian Tietz Photography seeking Faces of Philanthropy nominations

Deadline is Nov. 25; winners to be honored with spring art exhibit and reception

In honor of National Philanthropy Day® (NPD), and in the spirit of philanthropy this November, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation and Brian Tietz Photography are seeking nominations for outstanding philanthropists in the our region to honor as one of the Southwest Florida Faces of Philanthropy.

Selected nominees will be photographed by commercial, editorial and corporate Photographer Brian Tietz,  and will be featured in the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s Photo Art Exhibit “Faces of Philanthropy” next spring.

“Faces of Philanthropy is a celebration of the giving spirit in Southwest Florida,” said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. “It all started when photographer Brian Tietz offered the gift of his talent to capture the essence of Southwest Florida philanthropists through his portraits. The Foundation knew we had to share this generous act with the whole community. I can’t think of a more fitting way of celebrating our 40-year history and honoring the legacy of our founders than by capturing the faces of those who are making a difference in our community now.”

Special receptions will be held during the Foundation’s 40th Anniversary Celebration on April 14 and 15, 2016. Nominees and those who nominated them will receive invitations.

Nominees must be passionate about our community and/or giving back to our community through their time, talent and/or treasure. They must live within the five-county area of Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties.

Deadline for nominations is midnight on Wednesday, Nov. 25.

To nominate a change-maker for the Faces of Philanthropy, visit www.floridacommunity.com/faces-of-philanthropy.

National Philanthropy Day is Nov. 15, the day that thousands of people celebrate “the love of humankind,” and come together to both put that word into action and recognize the change that word has brought to our communities. National Philanthropy Day is both an official day and a grassroots movement. Every year, since 1986 when President Ronald Reagan first proclaimed Nov. 15 as National Philanthropy Day, communities across the globe have celebrated by hosting events to recognize activities of donors, volunteers, foundations, leaders, corporations, and others engaged in philanthropy.

Tietz is based in Fort Myers and specializes in portrait and lifestyle images. Originally from Northern Wisconsin, he moved to the South Florida as a teenager and learned to love photography after his parents subscribed to the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times) newspaper. He worked his way through high school in the One Hour Photo Lab of a neighborhood Eckerd Drug Store, an experience that exposed him to the technical aspects of photography and offered an opportunity to learn from the successes and mistakes of tourists and amateur photographers who would come in on a daily basis.

Tietz went on to graduate from the University of Florida with a degree in journalism, which offered editorial photography opportunities. He has worked as a correspondent for wires like AP and Getty, and newspapers like USA Today and the New York Times.

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $61.2 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $2.9 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services. It also granted $782,000 in nonprofit grants including more than $551,000 in regional community impact grants and additional $450,000 in scholarship grants.

For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 239-274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

Creating Change Through the Noise (With A Little Help)

Creating Change Through the Noise (With A Little Help)

by Kelsie Ozanne. 2015 Florida Fellow

Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot of noise: fumes tumbling from car exhaust pipes, birds squawking from the treetops, people struggling to over speak the other, and electronic music booming from speakers. So much noise can be overwhelming, and it can mask what really matters. This summer, I’ve learned the importance of focused ambition— how to break away from the noise of people telling me why something won’t work and listening to the people telling me why it can.

As I drove over the white rocks of the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife’s driveway, I watched the circulating dust fade and two hurricane-proof buildings appear. A wildlife hospital and visitor center became my home for the summer. My first day was filled with press, sea turtles, baby birds, nametags, new faces and Florida heat. But, beyond all the excitement, I was left with one major hurdle to overcome. How could I make a lasting impression and effect on an already well-established organization in just eight weeks?
Dave Fleming, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s strategist, described the answer to my problem beautifully. He said I needed to focus on doing consistent, great work and using emotional intelligence, being not only self-aware but also aware of others, to better myself and those around me.

With this in mind, I’ve went to staff members and asked what they would like me to work on and tried to anticipate what needed improvement. I’ve redesigned programming and presentation descriptions to increase attendance of CROW’s programs; I’ve started a video project recording the interconnectedness of students, volunteers, staff and animals at our organization; I’ve developed messaging for wildlife rescue 101 and conservation medicine; I’ve strived for educating new and younger audiences by starting a CROW activity book.

From where we are now, I’m surprised and proud of how much I’ve already accomplished and how much I still can do. CROW and the foundation’s goals have aligned and created the right mix of strategic storytelling with hands-on development.

By definition, phenomena are supposed to be difficult to understand. But, the phenomenon I’ve experienced this summer isn’t. The Pygmalion effect happens when higher expectations lead to an increase in performance. It is clear to me that the foundation’s acceptance and appreciation for new ideas and open communication is the key component. Ambition isn’t always well received, but in hands of those who want to foster and harness the power of innovation, ambition transforms ideas into reality.

It’s easy to get distracted when surrounded by noise, but I’ve found purpose in this community’s effort to create change. This summer has shaped me into a true change-maker.

In an added effort to assist nonprofits funded by the SWFL Community Foundation this year, the Foundation is hosting four students studying public interest communications at the University of Florida as part of the Foundation’s Florida Fellowship program. Funded by the Al & Nancy Burnett Charitable Foundation, the students are working in three of our nonprofit grantee organizations this summer for an 8-week paid fellowship. For more information on the SWFL Community Foundation, its grants processes or to be part of the change that the grantees are working toward in the region, contact us at [email protected], or call us, we’d love to have a conversation, 239-274-5900.

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Wanderlust Southwest Florida Style

Wanderlust Southwest Florida Style

It has been said that all who wander are not lost, but recently I have discovered all who wander do not even need to leave Southwest Florida.  There is quite a lot of great wandering to be done right here in our own region.

Summertime is ripe for all kinds of staycations.  Actually as I write this column I am tucked away for the day in an undisclosed Southwest Florida location with an out of office message greeting anyone emailing and looking for me.

Just a few weeks ago, a close friend who was wandering (and not lost) made her way across the state for a visit.  She came for the sole purpose of reconnecting and catching up.  Other than a few quick phone calls on the way to meetings we had not been doing a great job staying in touch.  She is one of those friends that knows everything about me and likes me anyway so I was looking forward to a weekend staycation with her.

Once she arrived and we got settled in for the kind of winding conversations that are the hallmark of longstanding friendships, she asked the normal questions about my kids, my marriage, and life in general and seemed more interested than usual in what was happening at work.

I shared both the joys and struggles of my personal life with great ease but I noticed that when it came to talking about my work at the Southwest Florida Community Foundation I would quickly change the subject.  I would ask about her work or another topic we needed to cover.

For those of you that know me or read this column regularly, you know normally you cannot get to me STOP talking about the team and donors at the Foundation.  It is my number one cocktail party conversation.  My husband will tell you that he would enjoy me delving into other topics every once in a while.  So this question dodging with my friend caught me a little off guard.  I gave her some general answers about the needs in the region, our work on post secondary attainment, launching a new sustainability plan and our desire to stoke the fires of strategic philanthropy in Southwest Florida.

I could tell that she was interested but it was not what she was really asking.  She was my friend and she wanted to know the impact the work was having on me personally. Why couldn’t I give her an authentic answer?

The last night of her trip before her wandering took her elsewhere and my short staycation was over, she suggested we drive out to Captiva.  She lived in Southwest Florida years ago and had fond memories of the Islands.

It looked like it was going to storm and I was already thinking about everything I had to the next day and I made a weak attempt to wave off the idea.  But she persisted and we headed out through a light drizzle.

She just happened to have two chairs and a golf umbrella in the back of her car and we set up right by a jetty of rocks and the Gulf’s edge.

Just about the time I was going to say I couldn’t believe we were sitting at the beach in the rain an orchestra of paradise began to play.

As if on cue dolphins danced and played in the water right in front of us, pelicans dove for their evening meals, and fiddler crabs scurried right over my feet.  The rain stopped.  The clouds broke open to reveal a double rainbow and one of the most beautiful sunsets I have ever seen.

I looked at my friend and suddenly was ready to tell her all about why I was working at the Foundation.  I told her that this place, this region, mattered to me and I wanted to make sure that I supported all the efforts and passions of all the other people that it mattered to as well.

She said, “ You don’t need to say another word” and she took my picture so I would never forget.

I would like to hear what you love about Southwest Florida.  Please reach out to me somewhere over the rainbow at [email protected].

 

 

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $88 million, the Community Foundation has provided $61.2 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $2.9 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services. It granted $782,000 in nonprofit grants including more than $400,000 in regional community impact grants and additional $450,000 in scholarship grants.

 

For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 239-274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

 

Wild Patients

Wild Patients

by Rachel Rainbolt, Education Coordinator
Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife

This summer, as the SWFL Community Foundation gears up for the next competitive grant cycle, we have asked our 2015 grantees to send us their stories. Here this week we learn from Rachel Rainbolt of the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). The Foundation is pleased to partner with these change makers. If you have ideas and hope for the future, we’d love to hear from you at [email protected] or @SWFLCFnd on Twitter.

The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife is a teaching hospital and visitor center dedicated to saving wildlife through state-of-the-art veterinary care, research, education, and conservation medicine. Conservation medicine is a relatively new field that uses an interdisciplinary approach to study the relationship between ecological, human and animal health.

CROW is always continuing to grow with the community, and whether shared through an exhibit, a presentation or through live-feed footage, it is our responsibility to involve the community members in the lives of our patients. Since its inception in 1968 CROW has committed itself to treating wildlife that arrives to the hospital sick, injured or orphaned, and the “One World, One Health” approach to conservation medicine looks to improve the health of the environment, humans and animals through a better knowledge of wildlife medicine.

In addition to providing the highest quality of medical care, CROW offers educational opportunities for different members of the community in its visitor education center, which hosts more than 15,000 guests each year. By far one of the most significant additions for the visitor center has been with the introduction of the “If You Care, Leave It There” exhibit.

Believe it or not, but, prior to 2012, CROW used to admit a great deal of “abducted” babies. I am sure that even now there will be those reading this who believe by touching juvenile animals after they have ventured too far from the nest will result in parental neglect. Feel assured knowing that their instincts to raise healthy offspring will outweigh their fear of humans. Patient statistics supported the necessity for change, so CROW’s staff began producing literature regarding knowing the difference between animals that genuinely need help with those who would be best left where they were.

Support from the Southwest Florida Community Foundation has helped to empower this project by funding the “If You Care Exhibit”, which now serves as one of the main attractions in our education center. Its presence has been shared with 13 different groups from Lee County schools as well as thousands of visitors from all around the world.

If you’d like to learn more about our wild patients, contact us at www.crowclinic.org or call me at 239-472-3644, ext. 228.

About the SWFL Community Foundation
As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $88 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $61.2 million to date in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $2.9 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services. It granted $782,000 in nonprofit grants including more than $551,000 in regional community impact grants and additional $450,000 in scholarship grants. For more information, visit www.FloridaCommunity.com