NEWS

The Heart of a Postman

The Heart of a Postman

I had the great pleasure of living in a classic small town in Virginia for a number of years.  It looked like it jumped out of a Norman Rockwell painting and hosted the requisite small town July 4th parade and apple pie baking contests.  It was lovely.

I was totally enamored with the small town atmosphere and could not believe my good fortune when I learned we had moved in next store to a writer and a postman.   There was just something about living next store to a postman that completed the quaint small town vision I had painted in my head.

This postman was classically trained, which in my mind meant he walked his postal route up and down tree lined streets among the picket fences (ok I may be going a bit overboard on the descriptors).

I had never encountered a postman who delivered mail by foot with the help of the rolling mail cart.  He was personable and often brought peppers from his garden or home baked bread along with him on his route.

As a child I had always heard the unofficial creed of the postman that task them with delivering mail in all sorts of conditions, but had never taken it too seriously.  I just figured it was something they said, not an actual credo.

Once we moved in such close proximity to a mail carrier (which I am certain is the correct reference that I will use for the remainder of the column),  I knew I would have the opportunity to observe the seriousness of the commitment to the motto.

My new neighbor patiently shared that the creed I was referencing was not official in anyway, but he was able to recite it on cue.  “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”

I smiled politely and decided I would not ask any more questions and just quietly observe him over the change of the seasons and weather conditions.

One year in I realized official or not he lived by the creed.  I cannot think of a day we didn’t receive our mail.  He was a committed professional and beyond that had the best attitude I had ever seen.  When I would complain about a rainy day he would be donned in yellow rain gear and a smile, snow brought out a heavy coat, woolen cap and some whistling and the holiday mail kept him working overtime.

Watching him taught me that when you care about something that nothing would stand in your way to complete an appointed task or round.

I had not thought of this mail carrier in quite a while until over the last few weeks when I observed Southwest Floridians weather some uncharacteristic rain, wind and tornados.

We are in the height of season and are enjoying winter residents, bustling roads and restaurants and all sorts of cultural and fundraising events.  This time of year in Southwest Florida residents and guests can find something interesting going on and lots of opportunities to support local causes and charities.

So it was not surprising when the storms hit organizations worried if supporters would be willing to come out and brave the weather.  Relief groups and municipalities were concerned how to best aid those hit by tornados and wind damage and wondered if volunteers would be able to dodge the elements long enough to assist with clean up and offer much needed support.

But from all accounts it appears that Southwest Floridians have the heart of a small town postman.

Over the past few weeks, the fundraisers have been packed, clean up efforts are underway and just last night I attended a sold out play in which most of the patrons were first time visitors.  No one in the theatre had dry clothes or hair but they were there in support of the arts.

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays compassionate Southwest Floridian’s from the swift and caring completion of their appointed rounds.   A creed we can all live by.

 

About the SWFL Community Foundation

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants. Want to be part? It all starts with a conversation. Please call (239) 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southwest Florida siblings open fund to help future generations

Southwest Florida siblings open fund to help future generations

The next generation of philanthropists, those who fit into “Gen X” (born 1964-1980) or “Gen Y/Millennial” (born 1981-2000), will wield more philanthropic power than any previous generation, according to Nextgendonors.org. In 2014, 84 percent of millennials made a charitable donation.

The Devisse family of siblings, who grew up in Naples, is a prime example of this giving.

Brothers Marc, Matt and Julien, along with their sister Claire, recently opened a donor advised fund with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation in order to help the area’s children for decades to come.

“These siblings are what we call the ‘New’ Faces of Philanthropy,” said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. “Whether they want to give back to the communities that helped them be successful or they want to leave their current community better for future generations, these ‘Next Gen’ philanthropists are extremely passionate about their giving.”

The idea for the Devisse Fund began with oldest sibling Marc wanting to start a foundation to help local children, and approaching his brothers and sister to join him.

“Ever since my son was born, I’ve realized the importance of helping others,” said Marc, 32, a Florida Gulf Coast University alumnus who lives in Bonita Springs and owns Tri-Town Construction. “I see how much love that he is given and how happy he is in life, and it hurts me to see other children who don’t have basic needs taken care of for them. Kids should be able to remain carefree and not have to be forced to be adults and raise their siblings or have to worry about what they are going to eat or where they’re going to sleep. I am in a position that I can help, and I feel it’s my civic duty to do so, plus it feels really good.”

Marc started the fund with $500, and the other siblings joined in with individual matches.

“The four of us were very fortunate to have a stable household with loving parents growing up,” said Claire Devisse Gogan, 27, a realtor with John R. Wood Properties. “They gave us so much love, and they were always there for us. They also provided guidance and pushed us to be the best we can be. Because of that and the opportunities we were given, we are able to have the careers that we have today.”

According to the family, the plan is to grow the fund and continue to think of the best ways to help the siblings’ passions including less fortunate children, animals and more. A majority of the fund will be dedicated to children who want to improve their lives and the lives of others but have been put in unfortunate situations.

“I think our main focus is to continue to donate to the fund in order to set it up for the future and really be hands on down the road to make a difference,” said Julien, 29, a coastal engineer living in Wilmington, N.C. “It’s great to donate to various causes but you don’t always know where that money is going. This will allow us to be hands on and actively manage where our funds are going.”

Nextgendonors.org reports that four key aspects define millennials philanthropy: They are driven by values, not valuables; they want impact they can see and they want to know that their own involvement has contributed to that impact; giving without significant, hands-on engagement feels to them like a hollow investment with little assurance of impact; and rather than waiting until the sunset of their lives to decide who they are as philanthropists and what legacies they want to leave, these next gen major donors actively craft their identities now and actively think about their own legacies.

“We are all really excited about this,” said Matt, 25, a litigation attorney with Coleman, Yovanovich & Koester, P.A. “We are all interested in leaving this community better than we found it as kids. After learning about how easy it was to start a fund with the Community Foundation, it was a no brainer.”

“We were raised to help others and never take for granted what you have,” Claire added. “I think that played a big part in why we started this fund. We want to help others who may have not had the same opportunities that we did, because everyone deserves a chance to succeed.”

In addition to the new fund, the siblings are involved in a number of their local civic and charitable endeavors. Marc is the founder and current president of the Bonita Kiwanis, and his company holds an annual charity golf tournament that has benefitted Liberty Youth Ranch, Make-A-Wish and the Passion Foundation. Julien volunteers with Habitat for Humanity and the Cape Fear Volunteer Center as well as youth sports. Claire is a passionate volunteer with Domestic Animal Services. Matt is involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters as well as Kiwanis.

“It’s great that this allows me to work with my siblings who are all extremely intelligent and big thinkers,” Marc said. “I’m excited for the ideas and brainstorming that we have started and continue to improve on. Many people in our community have nothing, and we want to help change that.”

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants.

For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 239-274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

Most everyone enjoys a beautiful love story.  Whether it’s a best selling romance novel or watching an unexpected marriage proposal in a public venue we seem to be inspired by love.

Recently a friend’s son was planning to pop the question and I couldn’t get enough of the details.  I even had her text me photos from a photographer they had stationed nearby so I could see the moment he dropped to his knee in a beautiful sculpture garden.

If you haven’t been paying attention to the engagement scene lately you might be surprised to learn that proposals have become major productions that can include song and dance numbers, elaborate venues and photographers on hand to capture the whole affair.

We like to celebrate love and share it with others.   That’s the thing about love- it is primarily a “we” kind of experience. Love is experienced with other people.  Our first love is with our parents and family and then we expand to friends and significant others.  We have an inner circle of love relationships.   But what does it look like when we broaden our scope and love our neighbors- even those we have never met?  What does that kind of love look like?

The challenge is love by nature should be unconditional and that can limit how many people we can afford that commitment.  We have all experienced the moments when love becomes more difficult.  When a relationship is struggling, a child is challenging or a friendship becomes strained.   The idea of loving people we don’t know can seem overwhelming.

In the world of philanthropy we talk a lot about the love of giving but maybe not as much about the giving of love.  Interestingly the word philanthropy means love of humanity.  So how can we express this kind of love effectively?

In a piece published last Valentine’s Day  in the Chronicle of Philanthropy made the case that “philanthropy must lead with its heart.” Jennifer and Peter Buffett, who lead the NoVo Foundation, wrote:

As humanity progresses through time, our narcissistic tendencies may be getting the best of us. It’s imperative that we see ourselves in a loving relationship to each other and our planet if we are going to survive—collectively and quite possibly individually.

Over the last decade there has been a focus by donors on evaluation and results driven giving.  Philanthropists and funders began to question if love for humanity and causes was enough to make things better and wondered if their gifts were really making a difference.

More and more trainings and books began to emerge focused on running a nonprofit like a business with emphasis placed on return on investments.  In and of itself this is not a bad thing.  Now the field has a much better idea of how to measure and track results and can design solutions that lead to sustainable change.  But just like any shift we make in a field or industry we must make sure we don’t let the pendulum swing too far in one direction.  In other words continue to “love to give” effectively but don’t lose site of “give to love” from an emotional perspective.  The role of empathy, compassion and heartfelt connection must be part of the equation.

Just recently at the Southwest Florida Community Foundation we launched a conversation around customizing your giving.  The idea is that we want giving time and finances to be your favorite thing to do and we want to help you find what works best to meet those goals.    We understand that philanthropy and community involvement is no longer a one-size fits all proposition.  In a recent column I talked about having things “your way” when it comes to giving.  In today’s society we have grown accustomed to customization.

The goal of a customized plan around giving is not to encourage isolation, or narcissism which would move you further away from the “we” part of love, but instead to connect with you on what first inspired your love for others or the community and how to best design a plan to make that happen.

When we talk about giving, money is the last piece of the conversation.

First we talk about what you love and value.  Then we discuss what impact you want to make on those things and finally how you would like to customize your gift and measure the results.

Those components working in concert with each other are what create the most beautiful and enduring love stories for our community.

If you want to talk about your love of community, please contact me at [email protected]  I’d love to talk to you.

 

About the SWFL Community Foundation

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants. Want to be part? It all starts with a conversation. Please call (239) 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

 

 

 

Southwest Florida Community Foundation hosts Legacy Society event

Southwest Florida Community Foundation hosts Legacy Society event

As part of its three-event Legacy Society Member Exclusive series, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation recently hosted donors who either have a fund at the Foundation or have an estate gift planned for their favorite causes during an “Evening of Entertainment” at the Community Hub at its Foundation office on Jan. 24.

Legacy Society members enjoyed a cocktail reception followed by “Oh What a Night! A Jersey Boys Evening” performance by the Gulf Coast Symphony at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall.

Legacy Society members include any individual who has established an endowed fund, made a one-time gift or informed the Community Foundation that, upon his or her passing, a gift will be established. Being a member of the Community Foundation’s Legacy Society provides opportunities for meeting other supporters of the Foundation and developing new friendships.

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants. For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 239-274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.
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The Dream Lives on in 63 Million

The Dream Lives on in 63 Million

Last year 63 million Americans took time out of their daily lives to volunteer for nonprofit organizations.  The data crunchers who calculate these kinds of things report that if their work were translated into dollars it would equate to billions in wages.

Just think of a 63 million-person workforce with a multi billion-dollar budget.  That would be one powerhouse of a business.  It is hard to imagine the person that could launch and sustain that kind of enterprise.

Research points to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service as a catalyst for some of these incredible volunteer numbers.  The Day of Service started in 1994 to honor Dr. King.   A single man’s vision and the movement he inspired have generated a catalytic response to service.

Once again on January 18, 2016 millions came together to volunteer and honor the legacy of Dr. King, who never stopped asking the question, “What are you doing for others?”

I think the VolunteerMatch.org website summed it up best, “The MLK Day of Service is a moment to work together to fulfill King’s vision for a better America – it’s a day “on” instead of a day “off.”

Of course not all 63 million volunteer on the MLK Day of Service and not everyone limits their volunteer efforts to just one day on the calendar.   But many nonprofits report that the Day of Service introduces people to countless volunteer opportunities and scores of volunteers turn their one-day experience into a longer, more consistent commitment.  In many cases these volunteers become financial donors to the organizations as well.

Nationally, when persons of influence participate in the MLK Day of Service it can shed light on a little known nonprofits mission.  Just ask the nonprofit leaders of the sites that the First Family of the United States visits every year what the exposure does to their volunteer and donor base.  The first site President Obama visited in 2008 still sees the impact of his visit 7 years later.

Although the day receives a great deal of national attention, the magic happens at the local level in communities and neighborhoods. When I visited the VolunteerMatch website there were 331 volunteer opportunities available near   Southwest Florida and those were not exclusive to the MLK Day of Service.

And you don’t have to be POTUS (President of the United States) or FLOTUS (First Lady of the United States) to influence others to get involved.  Many report they participate in volunteering because a friend, co-worker or acquaintance encouraged them to participate.  Knowing this should inspire each of us to reach out to those we know to join us in our volunteer efforts or ask our colleagues and friends where they spend their time volunteering and join them.

It is a great chance to keep Dr. King’s dream alive and join the ranks of the 63 million trying to change the world through service.

 

About the SWFL Community Foundation

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants. Want to be part? It all starts with a conversation. Please call (239) 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

 

 

 

What Are You Thinking?

What Are You Thinking?

Asking someone what they are thinking can be a loaded question. The inquiry can take on many different tones, which elicit a variety of responses from the person fielding the question.

How many of us have seen our significant other staring off in the distance appearing to be deep in contemplative thought, but when questioned we realize they were thinking of something quite mundane or inconsequential? I don’t know about you, but when I ask my husband what he is thinking I am rarely met with the response I am expecting and he does not appear to be particularly fond of the question. He is a deep thinker but would prefer to share on his own timeline.

Or as a mom who has raised two teenagers and is actively raising a third, I tend to ask the “thinking” question in the past tense as in “WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?” Although, I am currently reading a book on the teenage brain that encourages me to never ask that question again as I will get no satisfactory answer.

On a positive note I think asking someone what they think can be empowering and insightful. Some of the best ideas I have ever heard came from moments when I ask others around me what they think or how they feel about a certain issue or opportunity. I have found the more diverse the group the better the ideas.

Some of the most powerful change occurs when nonprofit organizations include the end-user of their services in the design of their work. Asking people who live in neighborhoods how they can strengthen those neighborhoods is profoundly different that prescribing those solutions.

At the Southwest Florida Community Foundation it is critically important for us to know what our donors are thinking. The intent of their contributions, many which last in perpetuity, guides much of our work. Many times conversations will be begin with a general premise such as a desire to help children. But as we talk more, and listen more we learn additional important details about the why of the gift and what the donor is thinking. Their values and experiences shape how they intend their gift to make a difference.

I always try to guard against the tendency to decide exactly what I think about how to solve a challenge. That way of thinking is limiting. Unless I learn what others around me are thinking I have diminish the greatest potential for the really great ideas. Over the last few years the Foundation has invited a cross section of government, business, economic development, non-profit, education and philanthropic leaders to a collective table to discuss our region’s greatest opportunities. We have all learned a great deal from each other.

This is why I encourage anyone funding in our region or working to create change here to connect with the Foundation. We want to tell you what we are thinking and hear what is on your mind. And, by now I hope you know by now that I am listening, so please drop me a note to [email protected]

About the SWFL Community Foundation
As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants. Want to be part? It all starts with a conversation. Please call (239) 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

Southwest Florida Community Foundation hosts Prima Donors

Southwest Florida Community Foundation hosts Prima Donors

The Southwest Florida Community Foundation recently hosted more than 20 of its Women’s Legacy Fund’s Prima Donors for a dinner on Jan. 7.

Speakers included Samira Beckwith, president and CEO of Hope Healthcare, Robbie Roepstorff, chair of Healthy Lee, and Dale Reiss, Planned Parenthood national board member, discussing access to health care for women.

Prima Donors are local women who have contributed $10,000 or more to the Women’s Legacy Fund endowment and are committed to making an impact in their community through charitable giving.

The WLF also offers a contributor-giving level at $250 a year. The WLF was established in 2007 by the Community Foundation to enable women in Southwest Florida to direct their giving in focused, strategic ways. The Fund’s mission is to engage women in affecting change in our community through collective philanthropy.

As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants.

For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 239-274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com.

What are We Missing?

What are We Missing?

I am generally a glass half full type of person. I am a delusional optimist about most everything including my work.

A new year caters to this type of thinking, as the possibilities seem endless and well, possible.

So as I was reviewing the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s 2015 non-profit grantees I was feeling uplifted and energized.

I saw millions of dollars distributed out to a wide range of non-profits via a variety of established funds from donors who are both living and have passed away. The funds were assisting domestic animals and wildlife, the elderly, those suffering with disease, education initiatives, scholarships, and countless other causes and issues.

Donors and philanthropists work with us to create measurable change for the common good and their money seemed to be doing exactly what the donors’ intended- making our community and our world a better place to live, work, play and learn.

Just at the height of my euphoric end of year review I was suddenly struck with a glass half empty moment. It wasn’t discouragement, but rather clarity and I was reminded of the gaps that remain in our ability to support all the opportunities and challenges in our region.

As a perused the list again, I ached to see more to protect our precious water resources and ocean life, more for economic development ideas, more for mental health and more for the arts.

When I arrived at the Foundation 4 years ago there were no established Field of Interest Funds that provided the specific opportunity to grant to arts organizations or environmental groups through our completive grant program. These are two areas that any vital region must support and nurture and it was hard to explain to the non-profits working tirelessly in those areas.

Fortunately, through the work of passionate individuals and our board of trustees both of those funds now exist. They are small and growing but getting them set up was the first step. These funding sources were established once we openly shared the need and advocates and champions stepped up to make something happen. They feel great about what they were able to bring to our community and the Funds are endowed so they will be around forever.

As important as it is for us to celebrate the work that is being done through available funding, it is equally urgent to share the gaps in funding in our region. Not with a tone of pessimism but rather with optimistic opportunity. That’s the beauty of optimism. I believe that working together we can fill the gaps and create a more comprehensive stream of funding.

What I know about Southwest Florida and the people who live here is that when a challenge or opportunity is identified clearly, we rise to meet it.

So as you begin the New Year, consider how you could work alongside others and us to get something started. It is an amazing opportunity that could do so much good.


As leaders, conveners, grant makers and concierges of philanthropy, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation is a foundation built on community leadership with an inspired history of fostering regional change for the common good in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. The Community Foundation, founded in 1976, connects donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $93 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $63 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. Last year, it granted more than $3.2 million to nonprofit organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts, healthcare and human services, as well as provided regional community impact grants and scholarship grants.

Learn how to begin a career in health care at informational event

Learn how to begin a career in health care at informational event

Numerous local openings for Certified Nursing Assistants and tuition assistance available

CareerSource Southwest Florida, Lee Memorial Health System, Fort Myers Technical College and the Southwest Florida Community Foundation – all FutureMakers Coalition partners – are teaming up to hold an informational event for prospective students to learn about careers as Certified Nursing Assistants.

The event will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 19 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at CareerSource Southwest Florida, located at 4150 Ford Street Extension in Fort Myers.

Anyone interested in getting a start with a career in health care is encouraged to attend. The goal is to find interested students, get their tuition and related fees paid for so that they are ready for a new career in just one year.

Careers in health care continue to be in high demand, and CNAs benefit from tremendous opportunities with leading organizations, such as Lee Memorial Health System, that offer high wages as well as benefits such as insurance, vacation and tuition assistance for continuing education, according to Tessa LeSage, director of social innovation and sustainability for the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, the backbone organization of the FutureMakers Coalition. “This is a perfect example of how these FutureMakers Coalition partners are working together to create greater opportunities throughout the region,” LeSage said.

“We currently have numerous openings for CNAs at Lee Memorial Health System,” said Jon Cecil, chief human resources officer at Lee Memorial Health System. “We have a great need for responsible, caring and compassionate CNAs to work with our patients across Southwest Florida.”

Representatives and recruiters from LMHS, CareerSource and FMTC will be on hand to explore career options and discuss CNA qualifications, tuition assistance and scholarship opportunities with prospective candidates.

“This event is great opportunity for individuals to come in and sit down with a Lee Memorial representative and explore career options”, said Amy Furlow, CareerSource Southwest Florida’s center supervisor. “What a great way to start out 2016 with an opportunity to start a healthcare career with our area’s number one healthcare provider. Lee Memorial Health System is truly an Employer of Choice,” said Furlow.

“We are actively seeking candidates to join our team as soon as they graduate with their CNA credentials,” added Cecil.

For more information, call 239-424-3500.